Constitutional Health Network:
Heart Healthy Foods

You’ve probably heard something about the benefits of an alkaline diet—especially if you’re a television or movie fan. It seems like every other celebrity out there is promoting an alkaline diet right now, and there’s a good reason for that. Following the guidelines for an alkaline diet, provided you do it sensibly (more on that later) really does promote good health. Eating an alkaline diet (again, provided you do it sensibly) can help your body fight many of the ills of the modern world including inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, and even brittle bones. It may sound a little “out there,” but there’s actually some valid science behind the idea of eating for alkalinity. However, there’s a lot of misinformation out there too. Too many self-styled health gurus push the alkaline agenda without really understanding the science behind it. So today I’d like to explain just what an alkaline diet is (and isn’t) plus the ...

There’s a reason I talk about food so often here at Constitutional Health, and it’s not just because I like to eat. I talk about it for one simple reason: what we eat is incredibly important. From the nutrients—or lack of them—in our food to the herbicides and pesticides it’s exposed to, each bite of food that goes in our mouths affects every single cell in our bodies.   What’s happened to our food over my lifetime is nothing short of horrifying. In fact, I don’t think it’s too big of a stretch to say that more than half of the “food” we eat isn’t even really food—you only have to read the ingredient label to see that for yourself. So I talk about food—what we should and shouldn’t be eating, what’s full of sugar or preservatives, what’s most likely to be GMO and so on—whenever I can.     Every once in a while I try to throw a recipe in, because ...

Whether you follow health news regularly or you just like to eat well, unless you live under a rock you’ve probably read about the health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet. We’ve been told for years that this style of eating lowers the risk of a host of chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and even cancer. Now European researchers say that eating the Mediterranean way does twice as much good as taking statins for those with heart disease. The study was presented at the world’s largest heart conference, and scientists from across the globe—including the U.S.—attended. The results are the talk of Europe right now. The findings are so profound that there’s ongoing discussion of governments handing out—or at least subsidizing—free fruit and vegetables. But here’s the really interesting thing: The American media just isn’t reporting this story. The study was presented last week, and since then has ...

Those foods could turn our body into a breeding ground for Diabetes and Heart Disease "Pure, White, and Deadly.” It sounds like a euphemism for cocaine, the high-rolling, Wall Street-loving drug that American crop dusters have attempted to eradicate since 1994, spraying Columbian coca crops with glyphosate. "Pure, White, and Deadly” is the name of a 1972 book by John Yudkin, a British professor of nutrition. And no, it’s not a euphemism for cocaine, nor is it referring to glyphosate, which according to WHO causes skin rashes, respiratory problems, and miscarriages. John Yudkin is talking about sugar. He was the first nutritionist to sound the alarm on sugar, calling it the single greatest danger to our health. Too bad nobody listened... What Are The 5 Worst Foods for Diabetes and Heart Disease ? 1. Foods with Added Sugar John Yudkin was scientifically ahead of his time. But 14 years after he floated the hypothesis that sugar was a ...

It must be “Dangerous Procedure Week” here at Constitutional Health. It seems like each day I’ve come across some new warning about a supposedly-safe surgical procedure or device. News that something that was supposed to help instead hurts, or how some surgery Big Medicine has been doing for thirty years will really kill you quicker than a train. Everywhere I turn this week there’s doom and gloom and danger—and I’ve had enough of it.   So today, instead of telling you about the newest Big Pharma foray into your wallet, or the newest heart-related surgeries you should avoid, I’m going to do something different. I’m going to tell you about 5 foods that are surprisingly good for your heart in spite of their reputation. And I’m not going to stop there. Because I need a break from doom and gloom and I’ll bet you do too, I’m going to give you the recipe for a tasty summer meal guaranteed to put a smile on your ...

Two and a half thousand years ago, Hippocrates said “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.” And though Big Pharma and Big Medicine would like you to believe otherwise, this might just be the best piece of medical advice ever given.   For decades, the medical-industrial complex has told us to put our faith in drugs and surgery. They’ve pooh-poohed the idea that foods can cure—or even treat—disease even while declaring that foods can cause disease. (Low fat craze, anyone?) Anybody who didn’t toe the party line was called a quack and swiftly found their career going down the drain. Even today this is happening, as doctors who advocate food and lifestyle remedies over drugs are exposed to ridicule and sometimes even professional discipline.   Of course it doesn’t make sense. It stands to reason that if foods can cause disease they can also cure disease. Logic, however, had never been Big Pharma or ...

In a stunning “I told you so” moment for those of us who champion dietary supplements and nutritional healing, researchers have found that vitamin D supplements improve heart function in patients with heart failure. Like so much of the amazing research in the past couple years, this study comes out of the UK, this time from Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. The media is, of course, downplaying the significance of the study. The American media in particular seems unimpressed. And the medical establishment — other than the researchers running the study — is not surprisingly pulling the old “Well, we need more research” card. But here’s the thing: this study IS the “more research.” It simply reinforces what several other studies have shown in the past. Studies which — you guessed it — were greeted by “we need more research.” It’s inexpensive, readily available, and this study shows it ...

Although there's no clear victor on either side yet, the fat wars continue to rage in the medical world. I'm not talking about some new reality TV show, like the Biggest Loser. I'm talking about the real battle in the real world, where the winner gets to make the rules that will affect your health for the rest of your life. Whether that effect is good or bad depends entirely on which side wins. And it's looking like the tide may be quietly turning in favor of real health.    Since at least the 1980s, we've been told that dietary fat is bad. To avoid butter. Drink 2% milk. To buy lean hamburger, trim the fat off our steaks, and dress our salads with fat-free dressing. Fats were bad, carbs were good. Replace all that evil fat with carbs, we were told.    We've all seen how that worked out. Society has gotten progressively heavier, but we haven't gotten any healthier. The rates of chronic disease have just climbed higher ...

The war against supplements has been going on for a long, long time. Each year Congress floats a bill aimed to regulate them out of existence, and each year those of us who really care about our health manage to prevail. Every few weeks we're treated to some fear-mongering headline about the dangers of supplements while the very real perils of prescription drugs are glossed over.    For every news story about their benefits, there are two quoting pharma-backed "experts" who caution that "we need more research" in spite of a huge body of evidence. They tell us to "talk to our doctor" first — and we all know the doctor will choose drugs and surgery every time. There's a real concerted effort to keep us confused and in the dark.  This supplement could replace half of Big Pharma's drugs Why do they want us confused about supplements?    Because supplements cost Big Pharma money. Healthy ...

It's been a tough year for the American Heart Association and other Pharma-affiliated "expert" groups. Science has finally put the lie to some of the long-standing "dietary guidelines" they've been selling us for decades, and they're not happy about it. First cholesterol got the axe. The evidence that dietary cholesterol DOESN'T cause heart disease is now so compelling that even the USDA took it off their list of bad guys. Of course, that didn't stop the Big Medicine from expanding the guidelines for who should take cholesterol drugs. Big Pharma wants everyone on a pill. And when Big Pharma isn't happy, Big Medicine and the AMA aren't happy either. Saturated fat was also vindicated. Of course the AMA still recommends low fat. And the high-carb diet that has made us sick and overweight is still held up as a shining example — even though the evidence against it is overwhelming. Now salt is under the microscope, and the ...

Last month, the news outlets were broadcasting a truly astounding health claim: vitamin C does as much for your heart as exercise. Readers nation-wide rejoiced. No more gym membership! No more taking time out of the day to exercise! Finally, a healthy heart without any actual effort! Of course the old truism that "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is" came to mind. Imagine my surprise when I found, after researching this more deeply, that it actually is true - to some degree. The good news The study which grabbed the news headlines was only one of several. There's been a flurry of research into vitamin C and heart disease recently, and the results have all been encouraging. This study undoubtedly went viral because it tested vitamin C against exercise, rather than against a drug or a placebo. The study looked at the effect of vitamin C on the circulatory system. People who are overweight or obese tend to have blood vessels which are ...

There's no question about it: one of the best things you can do for your heart and body is to eat quality nutritious foods. Maintaining a healthy diet is also one of the best ways to prevent diseases. This is especially true as you age, since older adults are at a greater risk for certain health problems like cancer, stroke, and heart disease.    It's likely that you're already aware of this. You may already be striving to make healthier food choices for yourself and your family every day. If so, keep it up. Developing healthy lifestyle habits increases your longevity and allows you to live better.    But here's a problem: what exactly does a "healthy" diet look like? There's so much conflicting information in the media about nutrition. Eat that, not this. “This food” is bad for your heart, while “that food” is the new best thing. Fad diets come and go, and best-selling diet books fill our ...

Although Big Pharma is still fighting tooth and nail to keep its hand in your pocket and millions of prescriptions for statins are still being written each year, the cholesterol train has pretty much left the station.   Over the past couple of years, study after study has debunked the cholesterol-heart disease connection. The evidence — or lack thereof — has been compelling enough that even many doctors are beginning to question whether cholesterol numbers can really predict who will get heart disease. Most doctors, however, continue to toe the party line and prescribe cholesterol-lowering drugs like Christmas candy. Why the disconnect between the evidence and their actions?   Peer pressure.   Doctors who speak out are often crucified by others. If they’re Dr. Mehmet Oz or Dr. Joseph Mercola, this might not be the end of the world. When you’re a household name and have a huge marketing machine behind you, a little ...

We do a lot of talking about what’s in our food. We talk about calories. We talk about protein and carbs and fat. We talk about additives and preservatives, artificial colors and flavors. We talk a lot about added sugar and high fructose corn syrup. We talk about GMOS and pesticide residues. What we don’t talk so much about is what’s not in our food. And we should. The food we eat today is a different thing than the food we ate 50 years ago. And I don’t mean just the hyper-processed junk that passes for food for so many of us. I’m talking about the real food — the fruits and vegetables, the meat and dairy, the grains. What we’re eating today is fundamentally different than what our grandparents or even our parents ate. It is, in a word, not nearly as nutritious as it used to be. Multiple studies have documented this disturbing fact. One of the most notable came from the University of Texas back in 2004, and it found frightening ...

Garlic has been used as a medicine for millennia. Over the centuries, it's been used as a remedy for everything from coughs to cancer. Before the discovery of antibiotics, it was even used as a wound dressing to lower the risk of infection. So does it actually work for any of these things? While no one is suggesting that we stop using penicillin and start using garlic cloves, studies do consistently find that garlic is a very effective treatment for coronary heart disease. The most recent study, to be published in the Journal of Nutrition, found that garlic — specifically, aged garlic — prevents, reduces, and even reverses the buildup of soft plaque in arteries. Garlic really does fight heart disease For this study, one group took a placebo and another took 2,400 mg of aged garlic extract. They were first examined with Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography. This is a type of imaging tool (like an MRI or CT scan) that looks at the arteries leading to the ...

A recent study from the UK's Cardiff University and British supplement maker Cultech Ltd. highlights a new trend in the healthcare world—medical supplements. The United States doesn't allow dietary supplements such as vitamins or herbs to make health claims on their labels—to do this, they would have to go through FDA drug approval process. However, some other nations do—if the science backs up the claims. And this could be a very rich vein of revenue to be mined for those willing to undertake the science.    The study in question looks at the effect of a combination of omega-3 fatty acids, flavanols, and phytosterols on atherosclerosis. As it turns out, they appear to be an effective treatment. But you don't need to buy a supplement to get them.  Do "superfoods" make for a "super supplement" that can treat heart disease? Atherosclerosis is the most common type of cardiovascular disease. It's a ...

Decades ago medicine, in its infinite wisdom, declared that too much salt causes high blood pressure. (Just as it declared that fat is bad for you and dietary cholesterol causes heart disease.) Everyone was advised to sharply limit their salt intake regardless of what their blood pressure was. And people whose pressure was already high were often put not just on a low-salt but a no salt diet. It didn’t take long for the research disputing this advice to start stacking up. But as usual, any study that called the new “standard of care” into question was largely ignored by those who make the rules. We all know how it goes: once a new “guideline” is issued, any research that contradicts it is denied, ridiculed, or outright buried. And that’s exactly what happened with salt. The newest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend cutting back to the lowest amount ever. This goes against mounting evidence that too much salt doesn’t actually ...

Nearly every year Big Pharma rolls out another diabetes drug, like a car manufacturer introducing the latest model. Often the new model isn’t a bit more effective than the older, safer ones, and even more often the new model hasn’t been safety tested. This can mean serious health problems for the human guinea pigs who get a prescription. We are not keen on being a test-crash dummy, now is the time to tell Big Pharma where to stick its pills. Here are 6 tools for controlling blood sugar naturally: 1. Supplement for diet with this kitchen staple The spice cabinet holds one of the most potent and well-researched natural diabetes treatments out there. Sweet and spicy, it’s been a staple of cooking for thousands of years. Now, science says it can lower blood glucose too. I’m talking about cinnamon. Plain, powdered cinnamon. The stuff you sprinkle on cinnamon toast and apple pie. A now-famous study published in the journal Diabetes Care back in ...

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