Constitutional Health Network:
Most Popular

Nearly every year Big Pharma rolls out another diabetes drug, like a car manufacturer introducing the latest model. Often the new model isn’t a bit more effective than the older, safer ones, and even more often the new model hasn’t been safety tested. This can mean serious health problems for the human guinea pigs who get a prescription. We are not keen on being a test-crash dummy, now is the time to tell Big Pharma where to stick its pills. Here are 6 tools for controlling blood sugar naturally: 1. Supplement for diet with this kitchen staple The spice cabinet holds one of the most potent and well-researched natural diabetes treatments out there. Sweet and spicy, it’s been a staple of cooking for thousands of years. Now, science says it can lower blood glucose too. I’m talking about cinnamon. Plain, powdered cinnamon. The stuff you sprinkle on cinnamon toast and apple pie. A now-famous study published in the journal Diabetes Care back in ...

Rice is a large component of the typical Asian diet, but health authorities are now saying that this staple food is even worse than sugary drinks. The Singapore health officials have now labeled white rice Public Enemy Number One in the fight against diabetes. While sugar-laden soda and obesity are the prime causes of diabetes in the western world, Singapore Health Promotion Board chief executive Zee Yoon Kang says that Asians are already more likely to develop diabetes than Caucasians and the starch in white rice may just push them over the edge. And he’s got the science to back this statement up. Mr. Zee’s claim is based on a large meta-analysis of studies including more than 350,000 people and spanning some 20 years. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, presented some chilling findings for anyone who eats white rice on a regular basis. It found that eating just one plate of white rice per day raised the risk of diabetes by a shocking ...

Let's be clear: drug companies love medications. Lobbyists in Washington love medications. Even many of our doctors love medications. Why? Because making and selling medications is a multi-billion dollar industry. Are all medications bad? No, certainly not. Modern medicine has many life-saving benefits. This includes better technology and medications that treat a variety of illnesses. I'm not here to demonize prescription drugs. There are situations when the use of medication is completely appropriate. But we all know what happens at the end of a drug commercial. The voice-over person begins talking a mile a minute, spewing out a long list of side-effects. They talk so fast that we can barely understand them.  …and we all know why. Medications come with side effects. Many of these side effects are severe and dangerous. Yet people are so quick to take medications because it ...

If you have diabetes, your doctor might just be over-treating you. According to a recent study in the medical journal BMJ, more than half of those with diabetes are getting way too many tests. And as we know, too many tests usually leads to too many — or too strong — medications.   The study looked at how often diabetics were given a hemoglobin A1C test. This is a test designed to look at how well your blood sugar has been controlled in the past three months. It’s intended to be done only once or possibly twice per year if your sugar is well-controlled. The study found that, far from once per year, a whopping 55% of people were tested three to four times. And 6% were tested five times or more.   But when did Big Medicine let a guideline stand in the way of profit?   More frequent testing isn’t just a hassle, or an extra expense. Like so many other “routine” tests, more frequent hemoglobin A1C tests are ...

Those foods could turn our body into a breeding ground for Diabetes and Heart Disease "Pure, White, and Deadly.” It sounds like a euphemism for cocaine, the high-rolling, Wall Street-loving drug that American crop dusters have attempted to eradicate since 1994, spraying Columbian coca crops with glyphosate. "Pure, White, and Deadly” is the name of a 1972 book by John Yudkin, a British professor of nutrition. And no, it’s not a euphemism for cocaine, nor is it referring to glyphosate, which according to WHO causes skin rashes, respiratory problems, and miscarriages. John Yudkin is talking about sugar. He was the first nutritionist to sound the alarm on sugar, calling it the single greatest danger to our health. Too bad nobody listened... What Are The 5 Worst Foods for Diabetes and Heart Disease ? 1. Foods with Added Sugar John Yudkin was scientifically ahead of his time. But 14 years after he floated the hypothesis that sugar was a ...

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk. Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage. This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes. Participants were divided into three groups. Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises. Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin. Group #3 was given a placebo. The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop ...

Anyone who’s truly health-conscious knows by now about the dangers of sugar and the high-carb diet we were told to eat for decades. And some of you—especially regular readers—may know that science has been aware of these dangers since the mid-1900s. In the 1950s and 60s there were two competing theories. One said that heart disease was primarily caused by fat. The other, which had more evidence to back it up, pointed the finger directly at sugar.   The main voice of the anti-sugar movement was a man named John Yudkin. Now Yudkin wasn’t a nobody. He wasn’t some fringe scientist or snake oil salesman. He was a respected professional—the founder of the nutrition department at London’s prestigious Queen Elizabeth College. Like Dr. Robert Lustig today, Yudkin warned that sugar, not fat, was at the root of heart disease and other chronic ills. Unlike Dr. Lustig, Yudkin’s research was buried and his career destroyed because of ...

Twenty-five years ago, the idea that “happiness is a choice” was profound. Today it’s a meme, as meaningless as dozens of other tired old clichés that get thrown around. In fact, to a certain segment of the population it’s become little more than a way to judge and belittle people. Having a bad week? Going through a rough patch in your life? Well (these folks say) happiness is a choice, and if you just tried harder… We all know people like this. And not surprisingly...they’re often not the happiest people themselves. You see, they’re missing the point. “Happiness is a choice” has some truth in it, but it’s a huge oversimplification. Happiness isn’t just a choice. It’s a bunch of choices. You don’t just wake up one day and tell yourself, “I’m going to be happy from now on” and that’s that. You can’t flip a mental switch and go from discontent to happiness in the ...

You've been lied to for 40 years...   You hear it all the time…   Even Mom said it when we were sick…   “Drink lots of water….”   We all know proper hydration is essential for our health... And we all know the best way to stay hydrated is to drink lots of water….   ...simple right?   But what if your water isn’t hydrating you? What if you drink bottle after bottle and you’re STILL chronically dehydrated?   Does it mean something’s wrong with you?   No….at least not yet...   It means something is wrong with your water.   >>> Watch this video right now and learn the shocking truth about bottled water...    If you’re drinking bottled water, there’s a good chance that you’re chronically dehydrated no matter how much you drink. And it could be ...

Pain medicine pioneer Dr. Norman Shealy claims “Every known illness is associated with a magnesium deficiency.” While I wouldn’t go that far, I must say that it really is an incredibly important mineral. And I can heartily agree with the second part of his statement. Magnesium, he says, is “the missing cure to many diseases.” Magnesium is a macro mineral. That means it’s a mineral we need to eat in milligrams rather than micrograms. It’s used by every organ. It’s present in cells throughout our bodies. It’s necessary for hundreds of different physiological processes. And a lack of it can start a cascade of health problems that become progressively more serious the more deficient we are. It’s estimated that less than a quarter of us get the recommended daily allowance of magnesium—310-320 mg for women and 400-420 for men. And the RDA is far from the optimal amount. The RDA is just the smallest amount necessary ...

If you don’t know your credit score you probably live under a rock. Or you’ve never turned on a television and been bombarded with ads promising to get you a free copy of your credit report or “repair” bad credit. What you may not know is that there are hundreds of other consumer scoring systems out there, systems that rate everything from how likely you are to buy a product to whether you’re a security risk when you step on a plane. Most of these scores are secret. So secret, in fact, that you aren’t allowed to see them or even know of their existence. They affect your life in a billion different ways both large and small. And while all are a blatant invasion of privacy, some are more dangerous than others. One of the most frightening is the FICO “Medication Adherence Scale.” Big Brother says you WILL take your meds A little over a year after the passage of the so-called Affordable Care Act, the credit score gods at ...

We all forget things, no matter what our age. And in spite of the myth of the “senior moment,” recent studies have found that the “millennial” generation is actually more likely to be forgetful than their parents and grandparents. Nonetheless, lapses in memory can be worrying—particularly if you find them happening often. But don’t panic. There are lots of causes of forgetfulness, and most are easily remedied.   I’ve already discussed some of the things that affect your ability to stay focused, and many of them—like chronic stress and lack of sleep— overlap with memory issues. Today I’d like to talk about 4 things that can have a serious effect on your memory , and what you can do about them. Vitamin B12 deficiency Lack of B12 leads to shrinkage of your brain, particularly the hippocampus—the part of your brain involved in creating and storing memories. This is the part of your brain where ...

Maybe it’s a slow news week. Maybe it’s just a new push for your dollars and Big Medicine needs to ramp up the fear factor so people will open their wallets. Whatever the reason, the past couple of weeks I’ve noticed a lot of ads and articles urging people to get the shingles vaccine. And that just makes me break out in an itchy rash of frustration.   Make no mistake, shingles is an extremely nasty disease to have. It’s painful. Although they’re rare it can have truly awful complications. It’s a virus, so there’s little that can be done to treat it. It would be wonderful if there really was something which could prevent it. But…the shingles vaccine probably isn’t the answer. Like the flu vaccine campaign, the shingles propaganda boils down to a whole lot of hype, doublespeak, and withheld information. Here’s what you really need to know about the shingles vaccine. You’d have to ...

A few weeks ago I told you about so-called “superagers”—people over 80 with the brains of folks 30 years younger. To recap: scientists have identified a tiny subset of the population that seems unremarkable till they hit middle age. But once they hit their fifties, these folks don’t show the decrease in memory ability that we normally see in the “senior” population. It’s as if their brains get to age 50 or 55 and then just stop aging.   There doesn’t seem to be any common thread connecting them. Their IQs are all over the place, so it isn’t a matter of simply being more intelligent to begin with. Nor does it seem to be lifestyle-related; some have lived very health-conscious lives while others smoke, drink, and eat what they want. It’s a puzzle science would dearly like to solve.   Scientists are frantically searching for some common factor that causes “superagers’” brains to stay ...

There’s good news on the horizon for both Alzheimer’s patients and for supporters of medical marijuana. THC—one of the active compounds in marijuana—has been found to remove the clumps of toxic amyloid plaque that build up in the brains of Alzheimer’s victims. If you’re not familiar with THC, it’s short for tetrahydrocannabinol. It's one of the two main chemical components of marijuana. It’s powerful medicine. It’s also the chemical which give you a “high.” In spite of this, THC is currently used to treat an amazing array of conditions from chronic pain to the side effects of chemotherapy. And while federal law still makes it very difficult to study the medicinal effects of cannabis (marijuana), more research is being done every day. There are already several cannabis-based prescription drugs on the market and more are in the works. Although cannabis has been studied as a possible treatment for some types ...

Two and a half thousand years ago, Hippocrates said “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.” And though Big Pharma and Big Medicine would like you to believe otherwise, this might just be the best piece of medical advice ever given.   For decades, the medical-industrial complex has told us to put our faith in drugs and surgery. They’ve pooh-poohed the idea that foods can cure—or even treat—disease even while declaring that foods can cause disease. (Low fat craze, anyone?) Anybody who didn’t toe the party line was called a quack and swiftly found their career going down the drain. Even today this is happening, as doctors who advocate food and lifestyle remedies over drugs are exposed to ridicule and sometimes even professional discipline.   Of course it doesn’t make sense. It stands to reason that if foods can cause disease they can also cure disease. Logic, however, had never been Big Pharma or ...

So what happens when your brain shrinks? If you think a shrinking brain sounds like the plot for a horror movie or a thriller, think again.Your brain is shrinking right now, this very instant. And it will continue to shrink for as long as you live. Does this mean you'll end up with a brain the size of a raisin if you live long enough? No. It does mean that as you age it may take you longer to process some information, or have more difficulty with some topics than others. The bad news is that it's a normal process that happens to everyone. The good news is that there's something you can do about it. The incredible shrinking brain: not a movie title, just biology Throughout childhood, our brains grow at an amazing rate. During our teens and even our twenties they're in a constant state of creating new connections and removing disused ones, and brain size stays fairly steady. Once we pass our mid to late twenties, though, our brains slowly but ...

As far back as the 1960s, scientists noticed an interesting connection between water and heart disease. It appeared that if you had “hard” water—that is, water containing lots of minerals, the kind of water that ruins the heating element in your water heater and creates a scaly buildup in your teakettle—you were less likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke.   They couldn’t explain why, but it was an effect they saw over and over again: the “harder” your water, the lower your risk of heart problems. In fact, more than fifty studies scattered over nine different countries show this effect. More investigation revealed that this was partially due to the high magnesium content of hard water. Since then it’s been repeatedly shown that the higher your magnesium intake, the less likely you are to suffer a variety of heart problems including:   Coronary artery disease. Cardiac arrhythmia. Or ...

You’ve probably heard something about the benefits of an alkaline diet—especially if you’re a television or movie fan. It seems like every other celebrity out there is promoting an alkaline diet right now, and there’s a good reason for that. Following the guidelines for an alkaline diet, provided you do it sensibly (more on that later) really does promote good health. Eating an alkaline diet (again, provided you do it sensibly) can help your body fight many of the ills of the modern world including inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, and even brittle bones. It may sound a little “out there,” but there’s actually some valid science behind the idea of eating for alkalinity. However, there’s a lot of misinformation out there too. Too many self-styled health gurus push the alkaline agenda without really understanding the science behind it. So today I’d like to explain just what an alkaline diet is (and isn’t) plus the ...

We all know exercise is good for us. We know it’s one of the best ways to prevent heart disease, and one of the keys to recovering from a heart attack.   However, fitness is big business. And like most big businesses, the industry puts out a lot of questionable information and calls it the truth. Unfortunately, most of us don’t know a lot about the science of exercise, and sorting fact from fiction may be hard—so here are 10 harmful myths about fitness that you just shouldn’t believe. 1. Myth: If you don’t exercise when you’re young, it’s dangerous when you get older. Truth: Any age is the perfect time to start an exercise program. Whether you’re nine, nineteen, or ninety, there’s no reason you shouldn’t start. In fact, a 2009 study from Hebrew University Medical center found that people who began exercising as senior citizens lived longer than those who didn’t, even if they’d never ...

High blood pressure. Carrying too much weight. Diabetes. A family history of heart attacks. These are things everyone knows make you more likely to have a heart attack. You might be surprised, though, at some of the lesser-known things which also raise your heart attack risk. Are you taking ibuprofen or using antibacterial soap? You might want to switch to a natural product. Did you have a triple cheeseburger and fries for lunch? The old phrase “heart attack on a bun” might be right on target—but not for the reasons you expect. Below are 15 little-known triggers that can raise your risk of a heart attack, and sometimes even double it. They just might make you look at your habits in a whole new light. Trigger #1: Getting angry A 2015 Australian study found that people were more likely to have heart attacks in the two hours following an episode of intense anger. Those who said they’d been, “furious,” “enraged,” or ...

It’s a running joke that cats are really aliens bent on taking over the world and it turns out, the idea may not be so far off the mark. We’ve long known that cats play host to a parasite which can infect humans—this is why pregnant women are exempt from emptying the litter box. But while scientists thought that the parasite goes dormant once it infects humans, recent research shows that this isn’t the case at all. Not only does the beast not go dormant—it lives in your brain and exerts a sort of mind control. Aliens have invaded your brain. For real Toxoplasmosis gondii is a parasite that normally infects cats. It’s famous among scientists for its novel method of spreading itself from one cat to another—it hijacks rats and changes their behavior so that they’re more likely to get eaten. That’s more than a little creepy. Toxo leaves the host cat via cat feces. A rat comes in contact with it through contaminated ...

Have you ever forgotten where you left your car keys? Walked into a room and realized you have no idea why you’re there? Misplaced your sunglasses only to find they’re sitting on your head? If you’re over 50 you may have found yourself making a sheepish comment about “senior moments” after doing one of these things.   It’s a phrase that’s crept into our vocabulary over the past few years, and it’s used to excuse or explain away those embarrassing little episodes of forgetfulness. We sigh and shake our heads and mutter “senior moment,” then shrug and go on, accepting the idea that once we pass 40 our memories naturally become less reliable. The older we get the more forgetful we’re likely to be. Or so popular wisdom says.   But sometimes popular wisdom is pretty dumb. Here’s the truth:   The whole idea of “senior moments” is a myth. There’s no such ...

If you’re a regular reader of Constitutional Health, you already know my take on cholesterol-lowering statin drug use. If you’re a new reader, this is my view in a nutshell: I believe that statins are one of the biggest money-making schemes in history. In fact, they might even be the biggest.   Until their patents ran out, statins were the most profitable class of drugs in history. Pharma companies raked in untold billions once they hit the market, even though they were initially prescribed somewhat cautiously. As the money began to roll in, Big Pharma saw a Big Opportunity and pushed to get more people taking them. The “guidelines” for prescribing statins grew wider and wider. In the beginning, they were prescribed for people who had already had a heart attack or stroke. But as the net grew wider, they were prescribed for people with fewer and fewer “risk factors” for heart disease.   Today one person in four who’s ...

Last year we were shocked and scandalized when Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of one prescription drug from an already high $13.50 per pill to an unbelievable $750. The world was up in arms. The internet exploded with outrage. People were calling for the CEO’s head on a platter and it was headline news for months. Congressional hearings were even held to address the matter. But nothing happened. Absolutely nothing. No charges were filed. No effort was made to force the drugmaker to lower the price. No one got so much as a slap on the wrist. CEO Martin Shkreli was arrested—but the arrest had nothing to do with raising the drug price by 5000%. He was arrested for securities fraud, not for price-gouging. Of course we know price-gouging is nothing new when it comes to drugs. What was different about this case was the scope of it—5,000% rather than 50% or even 500%—and the sheer in-your-face audacity of the company that did it. Sure, ...

In the 1980s, an American doctor pioneered a cancer treatment that increased patients’ life expectancy by years. Why have you never heard about it? Because Big Medicine set out to silence him. The drug-free, no-radiation treatment for all cancers Nick Gonzales didn’t set out to be a cancer doctor. He planned to be a researcher instead. But during med school he met a man who would both change the course of his life and make a difference in the lives of hundreds of cancer patients.   William Kelley wasn’t a cancer doctor either. In fact, he wasn’t even a doctor—he was a dentist. He had, however, been treating “incurable” cancer patients for over 20 years with great success. Patients who had been given only months to live were still alive and well 5, 10, and even 15 years later. His treatment? Nutritional therapy. From 60 days to live to 8 years or more Gonzales was intrigued. He tracked down Kelley’s patients ...

Not long ago, I read a news headline I never thought I’d see in my lifetime. It said, “Drug Companies ‘Giving Up’ on Alzheimer’s treatment.” Alzheimer’s disease has been the holy grail of brain diseases for Big Pharma—irreversible, untreatable, and devastating, the company that created an effective treatment stood poised to charge any amount of money they wanted for it. The fact that pharma giants like Pfizer were throwing in the towel and turning their back on the almost infinite money that could be made from a treatment made several things crystal clear. It underscored just how very little we know about the brain in general and about Alzheimer’s in particular. It underlined what I’ve been saying for years—that we’re coming at the problem of Alzheimer’s all wrong. Science has assumed—even in the face of evidence to the contrary—that Alzheimer’s symptoms are caused by the ...

It probably won’t surprise you to hear that I’m not a fan of psychiatry. Psychiatric drugs are some of the most over-prescribed, useless, and even dangerous pills on the planet. And psychiatry seems determined to turn every little personality quirk and character trait into a “disorder” that needs medication. So what I’m about to say probably will surprise you. It might even shock you. So hold onto your seat. Are you ready? Here it is: Psychiatry just did something fantastic. At this year’s annual meeting of the American Psychiatric association, researchers presented a study that is so spot-on, so absolutely right, so downright sane that I had to read the news twice to make sure I wasn’t hallucinating. If anyone in the profession pays attention to this—which sadly, they probably won’t—it could begin to change the way mainstream medicine looks at some kinds of mental illness. What did this amazing study say? Simply ...

If you’re a die-hard list-maker, there may be many different reasons you keep up the habit. Maybe you feel you need lists to keep you “on task.” You might find they help you prioritize and get more done in the day. Maybe you’re just a little OCD and not starting your day with a list leaves you mildly off-balance and jittery. Ask five different list-makers what motivates them, and you’ll get fifty different enthusiastic answers. If you’re not a list-maker, though, the very thought of becoming one might make you feel a little anxious. Lists may make you feel boxed in. You might feel like they stifle your creativity and leave no room for spontaneity. In fact if you’re not a list-writer, just the idea of writing down and organizing your “to-do’s” can be downright panic-inducing. So you might want to take a deep, calming breath before we go on. Because today I’m here to tell you something scary: Making to-do lists ...

Garlic has been used as a medicine for millennia. Over the centuries, it's been used as a remedy for everything from coughs to cancer. Before the discovery of antibiotics, it was even used as a wound dressing to lower the risk of infection. So does it actually work for any of these things? While no one is suggesting that we stop using penicillin and start using garlic cloves, studies do consistently find that garlic is a very effective treatment for coronary heart disease. The most recent study, to be published in the Journal of Nutrition, found that garlic — specifically, aged garlic — prevents, reduces, and even reverses the buildup of soft plaque in arteries. Garlic really does fight heart disease For this study, one group took a placebo and another took 2,400 mg of aged garlic extract. They were first examined with Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography. This is a type of imaging tool (like an MRI or CT scan) that looks at the arteries leading to the ...

A few years ago, my friend Sarah got the kind of news that most of us only have nightmares about—her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. It was a terrible time for her. The woman who had loved her and cared for her all her life was slowly disintegrating before her eyes, and there was nothing anyone could do about it. No amount of medical care, love and tenderness, or even pleading with God made a difference. Dealing with dementia is, in many ways, like going through the stages of grief, and Sarah reacted as most people would. She bargained with God. She became angry and then depressed. And then, she was inspired to change her life. With the specter of someday facing the same fate in front of her, Sarah decided to fight back. She joined a gym and started exercising. She took supplements. She started meditating and took a yoga class after reading that these might help stave off dementia. She did puzzles and “brain teasers” in an effort to ...

The NSA has access to all of our phone conversations and texts. Google and Facebook track everything we do online. Now GE wants to store all of your medical information online. What could possibly go wrong?   A decade and a half ago, when the idea of electronic medical records started to take off, they sounded like a good idea. Technology was still a shiny new toy that we hadn’t gotten bored with. Much of the real work of the world was still done on paper. Electronic medical records promised to give doctors more time with patients by reducing paperwork.   Going digital was supposed to give us easy access to our own records. It was supposed to allow different members of the “healthcare team” to share information — notes, lab results, and even things like X-rays. It was supposed to streamline the whole process so healthcare providers could focus on their real jobs — taking care of patients — rather than acting as insurance ...

Have you ever been torn between "what your head is telling you" and "what your heart is telling you"? If so, you might be surprised at just how much your heart does have to say. It's a little-known fact outside of scientific circles, but your heart actually contains some 40,000 neurons — the same cells which make up the bulk of your brain.    And they don't just respond to directions from the brain. The heart also sends messages to the brain — messages that go beyond basic messages like pain signals and other unconscious data. It also sends messages to the parts of the brain which process thoughts and emotions. This means that your heart really can affect your decisions and feelings.    The phrase "listen to your heart" takes on a whole new meaning when you consider this information.  Exploring the "heart mind" The term "heart mind" was coined in 1991 to describe ...

When we accepted the “Affordable Care Act”—when we didn’t stand up en masse and simply refuse to comply—we sent a very clear message to all the Big Guys. The message was this: as a country, we’re willing to do whatever we’re told. Even when it violates our rights. Even when it’s not in our best interests. Even when it costs us money we simply don’t have. And even when it hurts our health. A lot of oppressive health laws have passed in the wake of the ACA, and more have been proposed. But there’s a piece of legislation on the table right now that should shake us up, wake us up, and light the fire under us that the ACA failed to kindle. It’s called the “21st Century Cures Act,” and if you care about your health or your family’s health it should scare the living crap out of you. Here are just a few of the things this bill proposes: It would give your private health information to ...

The guidelines on what “healthy” blood pressure is are all over the place. For decades, “normal” blood pressure was accepted as whatever your age was plus 100. So a twenty-year old was expected to have a BP no higher than 120/80. A forty-year old, 140/90. And if you were 60, a top number of 160 was considered perfectly acceptable. But medicine changes its mind more often than most of us change our socks, and today some doctors are trying to push blood pressure lower and lower. Many consider a BP of 140 “high” and prescribe drugs no matter what your age. And a growing number want to “aggressively” treat anything higher than 120/80, often using three or more drugs in the effort. This is not a good thing. Not only is there no evidence showing that aggressive treatment like this lowers your risk for heart disease, the side effects from the drugs can be profound. And here’s what no one is telling you: most people can lower ...

Something shocking is happening in the world of “healthcare” right now. There’s the medical equivalent of a catfight going on among “experts,” and it’s all centered on who should be put on blood pressure drugs. That there’s an argument over who’s right going on is no surprise—this happens all the time. Many medical “guidelines” are something that doctors viciously disagree about. “Guidelines” are often created by the most vocal “leaders” in the field, and often these leaders have an axe to grind. No. That there’s a catfight isn’t surprising. What is unheard of is that this one is happening in open sight of the public. So how high is YOUR blood pressure? Are you on medication? Has your doctor piled on more and more drugs in an effort to get it “low enough”? Do you feel like you were pushed into treatment? This post is a handy guide to the argument going on ...

This isn’t a political post. I try to stay out of politics unless there’s something concrete we can do, like call our Congresspeople and tell them to vote against the newest law aimed at trying to take over our health. Politics is a stinking swamp full of alligators, and stepping a toe into it is more than I want to do. That said, here’s what I want to talk about today: Politicians lie. They lie a lot. And they tell lies the size of Texas without turning a hair, appearing as sincere as you or me. If any of us didn’t already know this, the current election cycle makes it abundantly clear. And the bulk of the country is still smarting from whoppers like, “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor” and “the ACA will save the average family $2,500 a year.” Yes, politicians lie. And it seems like the longer they’re in office the more easily they lie and the bigger the lies become. Of course they’re not ...

For all the naysayers still denying the link between diabetes and diet soda, a new study just put several more nails in the coffin of your arguments. The study, from the prestigious Karolinska Institute in Sweden, found that drinking just 200 ml (less than 7 ounces) of diet soda per day made people a whopping 2.4 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. And drinking a liter a day—roughly one-and-a-half standard 20-oz bottles—made them a shocking ten times more likely to become diabetic.   If you feel like you’ve heard this before, you have.   At least once a year we get another well-designed study showing that diet soft drinks increase the likelihood of diabetes. Usually this is met with one or two inferior studies claiming that no, it’s sugary soft drinks that make you diabetic and diet versions are blameless.   Well. This study does what no other study to date has, at least to my knowledge. It found that both ...

If you spend a lot of time reading health news, it’s easy to get the idea that Americans are dropping like flies. There’s an aura of panic that runs through most health-related journalism, from pure “sky is falling” fearmongering to quieter but just as fear-filled stories on new drugs and treatments. They all have one thing in common: they’re designed to make us scared. To make us think we’re in danger of imminent death if we don’t do what we’re told. To get us to put our faith in Big Pharma and Big Medicine. And one of the biggest, scariest topics the media likes to focus on is heart disease. To hear the media tell it, if we make it past 65 without having a heart attack or heart surgery, it’s a miracle. If we’re not taking twenty different drugs and spending our life savings on “health” insurance and prescriptions, we’re just plain stupid. And if we’re audacious enough to take our health ...

Not too long ago, I visited an orthopedic surgeon for treatment of a hammertoe. The solution was surgery, a simple procedure that could be done on an outpatient basis. He quoted me a price of $1500, and a week later I had the surgery. No hassle, no fuss, and I was back on my feet in ten days. While I was recovering, I spoke with a friend of mine who told me he’d had the same procedure done a few months before. That in itself was not surprising—hammertoe is a common problem, and the surgery is standard treatment. What was surprising was how much he’d paid. Where I had paid a mere $1500, my friend’s surgery, performed at the same facility and by the same surgeon, had cost him an astonishing $5000—more than three times what I had paid. The difference? My friend’s surgery was “covered” by his insurance, whereas I had opted to pay cash. The secret no one tells you about medical bills While this story might sound shocking, it ...

If you haven’t read about it yet, “immunotherapy” is one of the hottest new medical treatments in development. It’s being hailed as a possible solution for everything from cancer to multiple sclerosis, and clinical trials are underway all over the country. It’s had some truly spectacular results in a few trials, putting cancer into remission at an unprecedented rate. There’s only one problem: It’s also killing people. Immunotherapy gets a pass even when people die Patients rarely die during clinical trials, and when they do it’s usually headline news—think of the world-wide shock and outrage when a patient died in a French drug trial last year. The entire western world was calling for answers. It dominated news headlines for weeks and still pops up now and again. Meanwhile, we practically have an epidemic of drug trial deaths going on in the United States, and the deaths all have two things in common: ...

There’s a reason I talk about food so often here at Constitutional Health, and it’s not just because I like to eat. I talk about it for one simple reason: what we eat is incredibly important. From the nutrients—or lack of them—in our food to the herbicides and pesticides it’s exposed to, each bite of food that goes in our mouths affects every single cell in our bodies.   What’s happened to our food over my lifetime is nothing short of horrifying. In fact, I don’t think it’s too big of a stretch to say that more than half of the “food” we eat isn’t even really food—you only have to read the ingredient label to see that for yourself. So I talk about food—what we should and shouldn’t be eating, what’s full of sugar or preservatives, what’s most likely to be GMO and so on—whenever I can.     Every once in a while I try to throw a recipe in, because ...

Astounding. Breakthrough. Game-changing. Usually when we hear words like these applied to something in medicine, the reality turns out to be much more mundane. These types of words are usually pulled out in an effort to generate enthusiasm for the latest drug. They're tossed around to promote the newest, priciest medical procedures. They’re most often marketing hype at best. Last year, however, scientists at the University of Virginia and the University of Rochester Medical Center made two separate discoveries that truly were astounding. They really were game-changing. They’re radical enough that the textbooks will literally have to be re-written to accommodate them. And they’re both firmly located in your brain. What they’ve discovered forces us to change the way we look at the relationship between the immune system and the brain. And it gives us new insight into how the brain handles waste-disposal. Together, these two discoveries may give ...

Imagine if there were a drug that could reduce the damage a heart attack causes to your heart. Imagine if it could reduce that damage by an incredible eighty percent. Imagine that this drug could cut your risk of cardiac arrest or death after a heart attack too. Imagine that it’s something paramedics can easily give you when the ambulance shows up. Now imagine that it only costs pennies on the dollar. Ok, you can stop imagining now…because this drug actually exists. So why haven’t you heard about it? Why are we not using it every time someone has a heart attack? Because Big Pharma flatly refuses to make it. Here’s why. This is what happens when medicine thinks outside the box Meet Harry Selker, director of the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. His grandfather was the inventor of the first automobile shock absorber, and Selker too has been a life-long tinkerer. But where his ...

Decades ago medicine, in its infinite wisdom, declared that too much salt causes high blood pressure. (Just as it declared that fat is bad for you and dietary cholesterol causes heart disease.) Everyone was advised to sharply limit their salt intake regardless of what their blood pressure was. And people whose pressure was already high were often put not just on a low-salt but a no salt diet. It didn’t take long for the research disputing this advice to start stacking up. But as usual, any study that called the new “standard of care” into question was largely ignored by those who make the rules. We all know how it goes: once a new “guideline” is issued, any research that contradicts it is denied, ridiculed, or outright buried. And that’s exactly what happened with salt. The newest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend cutting back to the lowest amount ever. This goes against mounting evidence that too much salt doesn’t actually ...

Earlier this year, the health news headlines were noisily trumpeting a very suspicious statistic. 40% of all Alzheimer’s cases, the news claimed, were caused by too much insulin or insulin resistance. It made a lot of people sit up and take notice. It scared a lot of people. And it prodded a lot of people into getting their blood sugar tested for “pre-diabetes” who would never have considered it otherwise. Many of them ended up on medication they didn’t want or need.   The spectre of Alzheimer’s will motivate us, it appears, like nothing else.   But where did this number come from? How valid is it? It appeared in some reputable news outlets. And it was presented as gospel truth, with lots of scary supporting statistics—“one-third of the population is pre-diabetic,” for example—yet the number kept changing. From 40%, it grew to “nearly half.” Before long that became just “half” and ...

If you have a hard time staying focused, you're not alone. Recent research says that the average focused attention span today is a mere 8 seconds. Goldfish have an attention span of about 9 seconds.    That's right. Most of us have a shorter attention span than a goldfish.  Why is this? Technology is partially to blame — we're constantly distracted by beeps and buzzes, email and Facebook. Even the least tech-savvy of us can have a problem, though. Many factors contribute to our inability to focus, from poor nutrition to lack of sleep.    We are more than the sum of our parts, and being a whole and healthy person means addressing all the different parts of ourselves — body, mind, and spirit. If you need a boost when it comes to memory and concentration, here are 15 simple things you can do not just for your mind, but for your body and spirit too. 1. Get enough sleep Lack of sleep doesn't just leave you ...

What makes creative people…well, creative? It’s a question both philosophers and scientists have asked throughout history. Surprisingly, today we’re no closer to an answer than we were a thousand years ago. We can look into the brain. We can see what areas light up when a person is involved in a creative activity. But understanding what brings on that burst of creativity in the first place is still beyond us. And when it comes to explaining that “spark” that makes some of us more creative than others…well, we just don’t know.   Luckily, when it comes to creativity the “how” is probably more important than the “why.” We might not know exactly what ignites that creative spark in the first place, but we do know some simple methods for fanning the flames to spur greater creativity. And even more luckily, there’s a very simple trick that takes practically no effort and only a few minutes of your ...

In the past decade we’ve discovered that your pancreas isn’t the only organ that produces insulin. Your brain also makes insulin and, like your body, it can become insulin-resistant. When that happens, your brain cells can’t use sugar properly and eventually they starve. This could be the beginning of the chain reaction that eventually leads to Alzheimer’s.     When your body becomes too insulin-resistant we call it type 2 diabetes. When it happens in your brain, we don’t call it anything…but maybe we should. A growing number of doctors now argue that we should start calling it what it is: type 3 diabetes.   But there’s good news.   You may have heard it before. A growing number of doctors are now arguing that Alzheimer’s should be considered “Type 3” diabetes.   Their reasoning is sound; in the past decade we’ve discovered that your pancreas isn’t the ...

The concept of Body Mass Index or BMI carries entirely too much weight in the medical world. We’re judged on and according to BMI in many cases, whether that judgement is warranted or not. And far too often that same judgement can have a real effect on our health. Those of us with a BMI above the “normal” range are more likely to be subjected to tests and offered “treatments” we may or may not actually need. And of course we already know that the more tests you’re given the more likely you are to end up with drugs you don’t need, or injuries or illness stemming from the testing itself. Medicine’s mandate is to find something wrong with us and sell us a treatment no matter how hard it may have to work to find a problem. Meanwhile, people in the “normal” range are given a pass and assumed to be “healthy” merely because their BMI number is more acceptable. Nevermind the fact that the BMI scale was ...

The news stories all start out the same: People with atrial fibrillation (afib)—a heart rhythm disorder—may have a higher risk of developing dementia, they say, and it may be due to a widely-used afib medication. What they don’t say (unless it’s buried deep in the middle of the story where no one will read it) is that this “afib medication” isn’t just used for atrial fibrillation.    It’s an incredibly common drug. It’s used to prevent strokes. It’s used both to treat heart attacks and to prevent them. It’s used for atrial fibrillation. It’s used to prevent blood clots after hip or knee replacement surgery. It’s used to treat deep vein thrombosis…the list goes on and on. It’s sold under the brand names Jantoven and Coumadin. The drug is warfarin, a blood thinner that till recently was the only game in town for many conditions.   Another thing they don’t ...

Last year, I told you about how the newest, priciest diabetes drugs like Jardiance and Victoza are making claims that they prevent heart disease. I told you how the news outlets were trumpeting these stories loudly while completely ignoring the safety issues with these drugs—not to mention the price tag. I’ve been waiting for the next development. These pricey pills are nearing the end of their patents, and Big Pharma is looking for ways to keep their hands in your wallet by keeping patented versions on the market. They’ve already managed this with Victoza, which I’ll talk about in a moment. Now they’re trying to do it with Jardiance. And considering the life-threatening side effects that were associated with Victoza, it’s a pretty sure bet that another incarnation of Jardiance—complete with shiny new patent protection—will be a shoo-in. Here’s what’s happening. Once again we’re human guinea ...

It’s been around for some 60 years. Medicine uses it to treat heavy metal poisoning. But mainstream medicine has laughed at the idea that “chelation therapy” could be useful for anything else.    Alternative medical practitioners, on the other hand, have been offering the treatment—which involves using the chemical EDTA to “bind” various minerals in the blood so your body can get rid of them—for decades. They claim it can treat a huge variety of conditions from heart disease to autism and even Alzheimer’s.    Some of the claims appear outlandish. Others, not so much.   Regardless, medicine hasn’t been interested. Science has looked down its arrogant nose with the same disdain it would give the idea of bloodletting or leeches. But the practice has continued. And enough people have claimed to benefit that at last the NIH decided to fund a trial that would settle the argument once and ...

I’ve been saying it for years: the answer to most of our chronic disease isn’t drugs, it’s changing the way we live. Study after study shows that lifestyle changes nearly always trump drug treatment for our biggest health problems like heart disease and diabetes and now there’s yet another study to add to the list. Researchers at the University of Helsinki in Finland have just given us one more reason to make sure we get enough sleep. Their study found that just one week of insufficient sleep raises your cholesterol. And more than that, it actually changes how the genes that regulate cholesterol work. Sleep isn’t self-indulgent, it’s vital to your health We’ve known for some time that lack of sleep makes you gain weight. We’ve known that it causes system-wide inflammation. Not long ago researchers showed that it causes beta-amyloid plaque to build up in your brain, just like it does in Alzheimer’s brains. The list of ...

When was the last time you enjoyed some peace and quiet? If you’re like most people, the answer is probably “It’s been a while.” Days, maybe. Weeks. Possibly even months. We live in a noisy world, and it’s becoming increasingly louder with each passing year. As technology has grown more sophisticated, so have the ways in which we subject ourselves to unnecessary noise.   Where once the loudest thing we had to endure was the early-morning crowing of a rooster, today we have countless types of noise inflicted on us nearly every waking moment—and it doesn’t stop when we sleep. Noise is a constant, and if the environment doesn’t assault us with enough we inflict it on ourselves.   Many of us keep the television on day in and day out, “for company.” We have the radio on in the background “to break the silence.” We have computers and phones, iPads and iPods and MP3 players, all pouring noise ...

Alzheimer’s disease may get most of the news headlines, but it’s far from the only frightening brain disease out there. There’s also Huntington’s disease, which in the end robs you of the ability to speak, walk, or control your movements. There’s multiple sclerosis, in which your own immune system attacks your nerves and your brain. There’s ALS, which eventually paralyses you and takes away the ability even to breathe on your own—usually within about five years. There are various types of dementia aside from Alzheimer’s. And then there’s Parkinson’s disease, which robs you of the ability to control your movements and eventually leaves you trapped in your own body even though your mind is intact. As many as 60,000 new cases of Parkinson’s are diagnosed each year, and victims may live with the disease for decades. There is no cure for any of these diseases. In fact, though we’re well-versed in the symptoms ...

Although Big Pharma is still fighting tooth and nail to keep its hand in your pocket and millions of prescriptions for statins are still being written each year, the cholesterol train has pretty much left the station. Over the past couple of years, study after study has debunked the cholesterol-heart disease connection. The evidence—or lack thereof—has been compelling enough that even many doctors are beginning to question whether cholesterol numbers can really predict who will get heart disease. Most doctors, however, continue to toe the party line and prescribe cholesterol-lowering drugs like Christmas candy. Why the disconnect between the evidence and their actions? Peer pressure. Doctors who speak out are often crucified by others. If they’re Dr. Mehmet Oz or Dr. Joseph Mercola, this might not be the end of the world. When you’re a household name and have a huge marketing machine behind you, a little controversy can be a good thing. However, ...

If you believe the most common sign that you’re having a heart attack is chest pain, you’re not alone. The stereotypical picture of a heart attack includes chest pain and pain in the left arm—but it’s not a very accurate picture. Because although chest pain is quite common, a large number of heart attack victims never experience it. In fact, nearly half of all heart attacks cause no symptoms at all, or symptoms so mild that the victim doesn’t realize what’s happening. These are what are commonly called “silent heart attacks.” And they can be deadly. A study published this year in the journal Circulation found that a shocking 45% of all heart attacks are of the “silent” variety. Till now, the official estimate had been that only some 20% to 30% of heart attacks were “silent,” so this study shakes things up a little. The study also found that having a silent heart attack increases your risk of dying from ...

You’ve probably heard it before. It seems like everyone from part-time gym rats to professional fitness trainers is telling us we shouldn’t do it. “You shouldn’t exercise at night, because…” The “because” might be any one of a dozen things, but the most common I hear are: “It releases endorphins.” (True, but that’s not a bad thing.) “It increases your adrenaline levels.” (Also true, but not a reason to not exercise at night as long as you don’t do it too close to bedtime.) “It raises your core temperature for several hours.” (True. Exercise does raise your core temperature for 5-6 hours afterward. Is that a reason not to exercise at night? Maybe, maybe not.) “You won’t sleep as well.” (Not necessarily true—the evidence is conflicting.) What you won’t hear is the REAL reason you shouldn’t work out at night. It’s ...

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and around the world. It's a billion dollar problem that affects as many as one in three Americans. It's been estimated that one person the United States dies from heart disease every 90 seconds - over 2,000 people per day. But as serious as these statistics are, there's hope. Most of the factors that lead to heart disease are lifestyle-related.    This is a good thing. It means that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing heart disease. Here are the top five things you can do that will reduce your risk of heart disease and improve your health overall:    #1 Don't worry about eating "right," just eat clean. The "right" foods to eat for your heart usually change with fad diets. But you can't go wrong with simple natural foods. Aim to make the majority of your shopping cart filled with lean meats and animal proteins, ...

“The science is settled.”   It’s a phrase I keep hearing lately. It’s usually in reference to “climate change,” but it gets applied to many other aspects of science and medicine too. And each time, it just makes my blood boil.    Now, the climate change crowd are self-righteous enough to say it outright. “Global warming is real—the science is settled!” Other fields of science, and medicine in particular, aren’t so open about it but the message is the same. It’s not said in so many words but the implication is there: this is the way we’ve been doing things for twenty years. Get over it. The science is settled.   Well I have news for you, folks. Real science is never “settled,” no matter what Big Pharma and Big Medicine would like you to think. It’s the very nature of science to be unsettled, to constantly change and grow as we make new discoveries, and ...

The big news this past week was about a type of malicious computer program called “ransomware.” And if you didn’t read any of the news stories, you need to know about this...because one day soon it might just affect your health.   Now, you probably already know what a computer virus is. You may have experienced first-hand the havoc viruses can wreak. But if you’ve never heard the term ransomware before, here’s the five-second definition: ransomware is a virus that locks you out of your own computer, then forces you to pay cash to get access to your own stuff. Like old-fashioned computer viruses, there are different types of ransomware. Some install pornography on your computer that won't go away till you pay up. Some install a program that hijacks your screen, covering everything up so that you just can't click on anything. Some encrypt your files and make them unreadable. In all these cases, the only solution is to pay the ...

In our crazy modern world of upside-down priorities, it’s become almost a badge of honor to be sleep-deprived. I hear it all the time—people bragging about how they “only need 4 or 5 hours of sleep” with a note of pride in their voices. They always seem so...smug. It’s as if sleeping is a vice. Something to be ashamed of. Somehow we’ve come to a point where sleep has been relegated to the status of a luxury, a secret pleasure that we only let ourselves enjoy on rare occasions—and often feel guilty about afterward. It’s time for a dose of reality: Sleep is not a luxury. It’s a necessity. Just like air and water and food, our bodies must have sleep, and not getting enough can lead to problems from minor inconveniences like a foggy memory to outright catastrophes like traffic accidents. Sleep deprivation is a huge problem in America, and it doesn’t just hurt us—it hurts other people too. According to the National ...

No matter how things may appear, the world is not all gloom and doom. There are awful things going on around us, of course. GMO food is a reality, and our voices really were ignored when we protested. Big Insurance really is reaching deep into our pockets for every last penny. Big Pharma really does have its tentacles stuck deep in the heart of government. None of this is our imaginations—we really are in the middle of a battle both for our health and our rights. BUT—and this is sometimes hard to remember—even in the midst of a battle there are islands of calm, instances of kindness, bright shining moments that make it possible to keep on going even when things seem their worst. When bombs are falling all around you, you have three choices: you can panic and run screaming right into the line of fire. You can huddle in your foxhole and pray that none of them hit you. Or you can grab whatever you have on hand and build a better bomb shelter. I think ...

A lot of things happened in the world of science and medicine last year. Some were downright terrifying—like the scientists creating human/animal hybrids or “chimeras” in labs dotted across the country. Or the secret meeting where scientists discussed building artificial human DNA from scratch. Or the scientists who created a new and deadly form of influenza in the lab. Some seriously scary things happened in science last year. But there were also some truly amazing stories, and not all of them got the coverage they deserved. For instance, scientists discovered a formerly unknown passageway between the brain and the rest of the body, which might be one of the keys to understanding Alzheimer’s. Others showed we might one day be able to restore memories we thought were forever lost to Alzheimer’s. And yet another group successfully froze and then thawed a rabbit brain without damaging the connections between neurons—something that was pure ...

If you can’t make it through the day without needing a nap, there could be a lot of reasons. Maybe you need a new mattress and your bed is beating you up. Maybe you’re eating too much sugar for breakfast and not enough protein. Maybe you sleep with a television on in your room or stay up too late checking Facebook. Maybe you don’t get enough exercise. Maybe you just overdid it the day before or you were up all night with a sick child or grandchild. There are a billion things that can leave you totally exhausted long before bedtime. We all have the occasional day where we wonder how we’ll even make it through lunch, much less dinner. However, if you find yourself exhausted for no obvious reason on a regular basis, there might be something else going on. But before you start worrying about whether you have a heart problem or there’s something wrong with your thyroid, you might consider something much simpler and more likely: It could be your ...

A few days ago a story in a popular online news magazine caught my eye. You may have seen it too. “Mental health problems are linked to a risk of dangerously high blood sugar levels,” the headline warned. Ok. No surprise there. Antidepressants are still one of the most-hyped types of drug on the market, despite the fact that they’re no more effective than a placebo and carry a big package of possible side effects. But as I read through the rather short article I discovered something interesting. The story changed the further down the page I read. What began as a straight-up statement that depressed people with diabetes are more likely to get their blood sugar under control morphed into a completely different story by the end of the page. Stories like this are a marketing ploy for Big Pharma — and here’s how it works It starts with a hopeful-sounding headline. In this case, the headline was taken directly from the Reuters story that ...

The past year has seen several new Alzheimer’s drugs fail in clinical trials. That’s no surprise. An effective Alzheimer’s drug is one of the holy grails of drug development, but to date we haven’t discovered one. For decades, medicine has told us that Alzheimer’s is due to the buildup of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. If we could just get rid of the plaque, the theory went, we could stop Alzheimer’s in it’s tracks. But it hasn’t worked out that way. What’s been surprising about the latest round of failed drugs isn’t that they didn’t work. It’s this: they did exactly what they were supposed to do. They did clear plaque out of the brain, or stop it from building up in the first place. But here’s the thing: it had zero effect on symptoms. This should suggest to anyone with half a brain that beta-amyloid plaque is not the problem. Could it be that this focus on plaques and tangles has ...

The world of exercise and fitness is full of clichés. Some of them are ridiculous—“no pain, no gain” comes to mind—and the majority of them are little more than thinly-disguised judgements against anyone who isn’t a gym rat.  But many of the things that we think of as clichés were, when someone first said them, not just true but strikingly true. And that even includes a handful of fitness clichés. Like this one:   Question: What kind of exercise is the best one for X? Answer: The one you’ll actually DO.   This is hands-down the truest statement I’ve ever heard about exercise, and it’s as true when it comes to heart health as to anything else. It doesn’t matter what kind of amazing benefits any given workout may offer if it’s not something you’ll actually jump in and do. So the first rule when it comes to exercise for your heart is this: pick something you enjoy. ...

Vaccines have fallen off the radar since the end of the 2015 measles “outbreaks,” which the media so desperately wanted to call an epidemic. However, just because they're not getting the 24/7 news coverage of last winter doesn't mean we can forget about the issue.   In the past nine months many states quietly introduced pro-vaccine legislation. All was intended to  remove your rights and further the agenda of mandatory vaccination for one and all. One popular type of bill seeks to tag, track, and marginalize those who choose not to vaccinate. Using schools to fan the flames Of the many different tracking trends, the most popular ones use schools to publish the “vaccination status” of students. One type of bill forces schools to publish only the percentage of students up to date on shots. Currently there are no repercussions for “underperforming” schools, but it's no stretch of the imagination to see this ...

Here’s a scenario for you: You go to the doctor for a “regular checkup.” You’re not sick. In fact you feel great. You go for a walk every day and you play tennis twice a week. You eat real food. You don’t smoke or drink. You don’t have high blood sugar, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. You are over 40 though, and the doc uses that as an excuse to run every test under the sun “just in case.” Of course everything comes back clear. You’re the picture of shining good health…or so you think. But you can’t escape the clutches of Big Medicine that easily, and your doctor tells you that you need to have a conversation about your weight. You’re confused. Your weight is well within the normal range. Your BMI is 19, also well within the “healthy” part of the scale. Your waist is slim, and though you don’t have “rock-hard abs,” you’re far from having a beer belly. ...

It must be “Dangerous Procedure Week” here at Constitutional Health. It seems like each day I’ve come across some new warning about a supposedly-safe surgical procedure or device. News that something that was supposed to help instead hurts, or how some surgery Big Medicine has been doing for thirty years will really kill you quicker than a train. Everywhere I turn this week there’s doom and gloom and danger—and I’ve had enough of it.   So today, instead of telling you about the newest Big Pharma foray into your wallet, or the newest heart-related surgeries you should avoid, I’m going to do something different. I’m going to tell you about 5 foods that are surprisingly good for your heart in spite of their reputation. And I’m not going to stop there. Because I need a break from doom and gloom and I’ll bet you do too, I’m going to give you the recipe for a tasty summer meal guaranteed to put a smile on your ...

Just a month ago, I couldn’t imagine I’d ever be in a position to talk about this. Of course I’ve dreamed about it. I’ve even prayed that a miracle might happen and we’d come to a point where we could talk about taking apart this monstrosity. But the truth is that I never, ever thought it would actually happen.   And yet here we are. Against all the odds, we have a president-elect who has vowed—not just once but many times—to repeal the abominable (un)Affordable Care Act. We have a Republican majority in Congress, which means a repeal might actually pass—if their outrage over the past six years wasn’t all political show. We have senators like Rand Paul saying that repealing Obamacare will be on the agenda for the first month of President Trump’s term.   It could actually happen, folks. We’ve won the battle, but the war isn’t over yet It could actually happen. But whether it will ...

If you take an over the counter anti-inflammatory like Advil, Motrin, or Aleve on a regular basis, you might want to think again. In 2015 the FDA changed the labeling on these drugs to warn that they not only might increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, they unequivocally do. And even short-term usage can make it happen. NSAIDs—killing people since the 1960s? Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) have been around for a long time. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) has been in use since the 1960s, and has been an OTC drug since the 80s. Naproxen (Aleve) was created in the late 70s. Although it was downgraded to OTC status in the mid-1990s in the U.S., it remains a prescription drug in most of the world. Today both are the go-to non-prescription drugs for everything from headaches to arthritis pain.   Several other prescription NSAIDs have been introduced in the intervening years, including Celebrex and the infamous Vioxx. All of these more recent ...

Back in 2010, when the so-called Affordable Care Act first passed, my objections to it were often met with the “car insurance” defense. I argued that the government has no constitutional right to force The People to buy goods or services from private businesses. The liberal answer was always, “Well what about car insurance?”   Now, the car insurance argument was always in response to the question of whether forced insurance was legal. However, it’s the perfect illustration of the difference between real insurance and the overfed monstrosity we currently have. The “car insurance” argument has 4 flat tires The way car insurance works is that if you have a wreck, your insurance will pay for repairs. If you hit another car, it will pay for those repairs too. If you get hurt, it will pay for your medical bills up to a certain dollar amount. And if you hurt someone else it will pay for their medical ...

If you have a smartphone, you may have noticed that every time you install an app it asks for “permissions.” An app may ask to use your camera, or to connect to your Facebook account. It may ask to use your location or to access your contact list or to connect to the internet. There’s a nearly endless list of “permissions” an app may need in order to work properly. And with each “permission” you give to an app, it can gather data—data that can be collected and sent to faceless corporations or sold on the open market. Your phone can access your email account and log your emails. It can monitor your Facebook account. It can log every key you press on the keyboard, every phone number you call. Anything you do through your phone can be noted and recorded. Now Big Medicine and Big Pharma want to harness the power of the cell phone to monitor you twenty-four hours per day…and the level they want to take this monitoring to is ...

Whether you follow health news regularly or you just like to eat well, unless you live under a rock you’ve probably read about the health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet. We’ve been told for years that this style of eating lowers the risk of a host of chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and even cancer. Now European researchers say that eating the Mediterranean way does twice as much good as taking statins for those with heart disease. The study was presented at the world’s largest heart conference, and scientists from across the globe—including the U.S.—attended. The results are the talk of Europe right now. The findings are so profound that there’s ongoing discussion of governments handing out—or at least subsidizing—free fruit and vegetables. But here’s the really interesting thing: The American media just isn’t reporting this story. The study was presented last week, and since then has ...

Eastern practices like yoga and meditation have always been popular with a certain subset of the population, but over the past decade or so they’ve really gone mainstream. If I’m honest, I’d have to say that this is due in large part to the “me too” mentality. Yoga and meditation suddenly became hip for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is that highly visible celebrities started endorsing them.   And that’s a good thing. People who might once have scoffed at trying something as “out there” as meditation or yoga have taken up the practices. Some, of course, drop out as soon as the novelty wears off. But for those who stick with it, the health benefits are often significant.   The sudden popularity of these and other mindful practices have had an added benefit: the anecdotal stories have spurred science to look into what effects they really have on our health. It’s thanks to this sudden upsurge in ...

Not so long ago, acupuncturists were viewed as little more than snake oil salesmen. No one was doing any research on acupuncture, because mainstream medicine refused to admit that it had any basis in reality. Nevermind that the Chinese have been treating disease with acupuncture for thousands of years—successfully, I might add. Because it doesn’t conform to our narrow Western views, stories about acupuncture were dismissed without even listening to them. Today acupuncture has gone mainstream. Most of us everyday Joes are less concerned with why something works than with how well it works. We want to know three things: Will it make me feel better? Does it have unpleasant or dangerous side effects? Will it cost me an arm and a leg? The answers are yes, no, and no. So in spite of Big Medicine’s efforts to stamp it out, acupuncture has slowly but surely gained a foothold in the field of health and wellness. Even the scientific world is beginning ...

A mere decade ago, conventional medicine scoffed at the idea that vitamin D deficiency was a problem in the U.S. Forward-thinking doctors who suggested taking more than the amount included in a  multivitamin were labeled quacks. “Experts” warned about the dangers of high doses of this essential vitamin, predicting dire results.   Today the tables have turned. Insufficient vitamin D intake has been tied to a score of health problems from heart disease to depression to cancer. Even Big Medicine can’t ignore the problem anymore. So if you think you get enough vitamin D just because you take a multivitamin or eat fortified foods, think again. You probably need considerably more than what you’re getting. Understanding RDAs for vitamins and minerals If you look at any supplement bottle, next to each vitamin or mineral you will see the “RDA” or Recommended Daily Allowance. Most people think that this is the optimal amount you ...

In a recent edition of Waking Lionheart, I talked about chelation therapy and how medicine is refusing to acknowledge a study showing it cuts the risk of death from heart disease . Chelation therapy, if you’ve never heard of it, uses the chemical EDTA to bind heavy metals—and possibly other pollutants—and remove them from your body. It’s been used for decades as a treatment for heavy metal poisoning, and alternative practitioners have been offering it as a treatment for heart disease for almost as long.   The study in question backed up that practice. It found that chelation lowered the number of deaths from heart disease significantly—as much as 43% in people with diabetes. Unfortunately Big Medicine is busy trying to make this study go away rather than asking why chelation appears to help. If they did, they might find the answer in one simple phrase: air pollution. The American Heart Association has been warning about air pollution ...

An amazing scientific breakthrough could mean that hundreds of thousands of people suffering from autoimmune diseases might finally have what they’ve been dreaming of: a cure. In diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, the immune system mistakes part of the body for a foreign invader and attacks it. This immune reaction causes chronic and sometimes even fatal disease. There are treatments for some of these diseases, but till now the only possibility for a cure was also likely to be fatal. Not just for hopeless cases anymore It’s been shown that a transplant of bone marrow stem cells can reset the immune system and reverse autoimmune diseases. But in order to successfully do this doctors must first destroy the patient’s own immune system with chemotherapy or radiation. This procedure is fatal about 20% of the time. And even when it doesn’t kill, it can cause massive damage throughout the body. The chemo and ...

If you’re one of the millions of people with Type 2 diabetes and you take medication, the world just got a little scarier.    There have been a slew of new diabetes drugs released over the past decade, each more pricey than the last but seldom more effective than what’s already on the market. Each one has been heavily marketed through direct-to-consumer advertising, and though many of them have had downright chilling side effects, those effects have been downplayed. Even the most frightening side effects—such as heart failure or cancer—have been relegated to the high-speed warning at the end of commercials, followed by a cheerful “Ask your doctor about this drug today!”   And we have. We’ve shelled out thousands of dollars and taken our pills like we’re told, blissfully ignorant of the dangers. So far, those life-threatening effects have included heart attacks (Avandia), heart failure (Januvia), cancer ...

“Let food be the medicine." It's advice that’s fallen in and out of favor throughout history. Some American pantry staples such as Kellog’s Corn Flakes and graham crackers started life as “medicinal” foods but are now on the “don’t eat that!” list. Others, such as the spice turmeric, show some real scientific potential. And sometimes unexpected foods show truly surprising health benefits. For example: recent research suggests that our pancakes might contain one of the keys to defeating Alzheimer’s disease—in the form of maple syrup. It might not be good for our waistlines but Canadian researchers say it appears to have a positive effect on our brains. Alzheimer’s disease is the most devastating form of dementia. It robs its victims of their memories, their personalities, and eventually their lives. It has no cure. And although science still doesn’t understand its root cause, it appears ...

In yet another stunning show of disregard for patient safety, the FDA just approved a drug that’s been shown to make people commit suicide in clinical trials. That’s right. Suicide. Oh—and it might also make you have a fatal heart attack, stroke, or other “cardiovascular event.” These concerns were recently brought up before an FDA panel, which then decided that “the benefits of this drug outweigh the risks” and approved it anyway. What? The benefits outweigh the risk of death by your own hand? It must be a true miracle drug. So is this a new cancer treatment? An Alzheimer’s drug that actually works? A cure for diabetes? Or maybe it treats something life-threatening for which there’s no current treatment at all? Surely the benefits must be earth-shaking if they outweigh the risk of SUICIDE or death from a heart attack, right? Wrong. This drug doesn’t treat any life-threatening condition. And ...

Not so long ago, the news outlets were broadcast a truly astounding health claim: vitamin C does as much for your heart as exercise. Readers nation-wide rejoiced. No more gym membership! No more taking time out of the day to exercise! Finally, a healthy heart without any actual effort! Of course the old truism that “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is” came to mind. Imagine my surprise when I found, after reading more deeply, that it actually is true—to a point. The good news The study which grabbed the news headlines was only one of several. There's been a flurry of research into vitamin C and heart disease recently, and the results have all been encouraging. This study undoubtedly went viral because it tested vitamin C against exercise, rather than against a drug or a placebo. The study looked at the effect of vitamin C on the circulatory system. People who are overweight or obese tend to have blood vessels which are ...

We live in an age of wonders. For all of its faults — most being driven by the wealthy and powerful who are funding scientific research — science has made some truly astounding discoveries over the past half century. Imagine — we decoded the human genome, the very essence of what makes us human! After that, what other area could be half as exciting? As it turns out, the brain could. The brain has become the next frontier for serious scientific research. While Big Pharma and Big Medicine are investigating Alzheimer’s disease with an eye to which chemical compounds will put the most money in the most pockets, hard science has been looking at other aspects of the brain. And some pretty astounding things have been happening. Researchers from a company called 21st Century Medicine recently announced that they had successfully frozen and thawed an intact brain. While many new outlets erroneously reported that scientists had “frozen and revived” ...

Several years ago, my mother was hospitalized with pneumonia. My father had already passed on, and I spent several days and nights trying to fill his shoes at her bedside in the hospital ward. I still remember the dizzying array of gadgets and monitors she was connected to. Gadgets to measure her pulse. Gadgets to measure the amount of oxygen in her blood. Gadgets to measure God knows what else. Just getting up to go to the bathroom was a major chore that required a nurse to come in and unhook everything. Being connected to all that technology was uncomfortable and stressful. It made it impossible for her to get comfortable. It made sleep difficult—every time she turned over, something came unhooked. The lights and beeps from the monitors kept her awake too. Then of course there were the constant interruptions of nurses coming in to read the monitors and write down what they said. And each time they left, the nurses would say the same thing: “Get some ...

If you turn on the TV to relax after a long day, you may want to re-think your strategy. This is especially true at the moment, while we wind up the end of a particularly stressful and divisive presidential campaign. But it’s also true during more “normal” times. While settling in for some Walking Dead or American Idol may seem fairly harmless, it just might be another stressor in an already stressful world.   Society has always had a love/hate relationship with television. Even as we tune in for the next installment of our favorite show, we’ve blamed TV for a variety of ills from short attention spans to violence to obesity. And while science has mixed opinions on the truth of these claims, recent research is beginning to back up what many of us who’ve cut the cord already knew: watching TV can stress you out.  Here’s why. It teaches you to be afraid Most “entertainment” shows fit into a handful of categories ...

“If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.”   Remember those words? Nearly six years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act, they live on in infamy. They were the ultimate Big Lie, and they’re exactly what came to mind as I read about the most recent prescription drug outrage. This time Big Pharma has taken a page from Big Insurance’s playbook, and the issue is set to go all the way to the Supreme Court. It’s called a “forced switch.” Big Pharma wants a monopoly on your wallet When it comes to an industry that fakes data and fights to keep lethal drugs on the market, nothing should surprise us. And yet, the idea of the “forced switch” seems unbelievable. Here’s what happens:   New drugs are granted a patent. This means that the only one who can manufacture and market the drug is the company that created it. Patents are granted for a certain number of years, after which they ...

We talk about Alzheimer’s a lot. We do it as a society. We do it here at Constitutional Health too. But although it may be the most talked-about—and probably the most frightening—it’s far from the only chronic brain disease. Multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, ALS and other degenerative brain diseases are equally devastating. They just destroy in different ways. One of the most common of these is Parkinson’s disease. It’s actually the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Like Alzheimer’s, it affects millions. Like Alzheimer’s, it kills brain cells and leads to loss of function. Sometimes, like Alzheimer’s, it leads to dementia. Like Alzheimer’s, there is no cure. And although it really hit the public consciousness when actor Michael J. Fox was diagnosed while only in his late twenties, like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s usually affects people over 50. Unlike Alzheimer’s, there ...

Nearly every culture in the world has a tradition of using heat for healing. The Romans, Greeks, Scandinavians, and many other cultures used saunas. Native Americans used “sweat lodges,” and many indigenous cultures used similar practices. But today, while we do still see saunas and sweats used for healing, the practice is largely limited to native cultures and “alternative” medicine. In the mainstream, the sauna or steam room is viewed as nothing more than a high-end relaxation technique—and a pricey one at that.   But this summer, a maverick psychiatrist making waves by suggesting we should re-think that view. According to him, these ancient heat-healing practices have the power to cure one of the most common but intractable forms of mental illness: depression. Feed a fever, starve depression? Dr. Charles Raison didn’t set out to find a treatment for depression. He was just intrigued by another culture.   While ...

A few days ago, I came across one of the most shocking headlines I’ve ever read:  “Scientists Get the Green Light to Resurrect the Dead with Stem Cells”   As the father of 20- and 30-something age kids, the first thing that flashed through my mind was “zombie apocalypse!” Of course, that’s just silly. On the other hand, I’ve been hearing rumors about rabies virus being developed as a biological weapon, and science recently discovered that your genes don’t actually shut down till several days after you die.   In light of those two things, plus all the other dark and crazy things to come out of the scientific world in the past year—creating the DNA blueprint for a completely new lifeform and the push to create an artificial human genome, just to name a couple—there’s not a lot that would surprise me right now. And as I’ll talk about in an upcoming issue of our paid newsletter ...

After a heart attack, you might think that the last thing you need to do is exercise. After all, your heart’s been injured, right? And when you injure a muscle, the best thing to do is to let it rest and recuperate. …Right? In the case of your heart, no. For decades, doctors prescribed bed rest immediately after a heart attack. Heart patients were advised to avoid physical activity, often for weeks or even months. Today we know better. The evidence is overwhelming—exercise is one of the best ways to help heal your heart and prevent a second heart attack. And the sooner you start doing it, the better. Can exercise mend a broken heart? You have a heart attack when blood flow to your heart is cut off. This leaves part of your heart muscle starved for oxygen, and the cells start to die. Once heart cells die, they’re not restored—your body fills in the damaged areas with scar tissue. These areas of scar tissue are thinner and weaker than the ...

When I was a kid, it was still very common for people to die of simple “old age.” And until old age did creep up on them, in general most folks were pretty healthy. I knew precisely two people who had diabetes, for example—one a family member who developed type 2 well into her 60s and one a child with type 1. The only people I knew who took high blood pressure medications were a handful of old folks, mostly in their 80s or nearing them. For the biggest part of my life, no one took anti-anxiety medications, though I did have one neighbor who took antidepressants for a few months. (She’d had a “nervous breakdown” after losing her husband. The entire neighborhood rallied to support her. After 3 months she stopped taking “her pills,” as she called them, and went on to have a perfectly normal life including a second marriage and two more children.) During my school career, the nurse’s office wasn’t full of asthma ...

It’s been a tough year for the American Heart Association and other Pharma-affiliated “expert” groups. Science has finally put the lie to some of the long-standing “dietary guidelines” they’ve been selling us for decades, and they’re not happy about it.   First cholesterol got the axe. The evidence that dietary cholesterol DOESN’T cause heart disease is now so compelling that even the USDA took it off their list of bad guys. Of course, that didn’t stop the Big Medicine from expanding the guidelines for who should take cholesterol drugs. Big Pharma wants everyone on a pill . And when Big Pharma isn’t happy, Big Medicine and the AMA aren’t happy either.   Saturated fat was also vindicated. Of course the AMA still recommends low fat. And the high-carb diet that has made us sick and overweight is still held up as a shining example — even though the evidence against it is ...

We do a lot of talking about what’s in our food. We talk about calories. We talk about protein and carbs and fat. We talk about additives and preservatives, artificial colors and flavors. We talk a lot about added sugar and high fructose corn syrup. We talk about GMOS and pesticide residues. What we don’t talk so much about is what’s not in our food. And we should. The food we eat today is a different thing than the food we ate 50 years ago. And I don’t mean just the hyper-processed junk that passes for food for so many of us. I’m talking about the real food — the fruits and vegetables, the meat and dairy, the grains. What we’re eating today is fundamentally different than what our grandparents or even our parents ate. It is, in a word, not nearly as nutritious as it used to be. Multiple studies have documented this disturbing fact. One of the most notable came from the University of Texas back in 2004, and it found frightening ...

Doctors know a lot. They spend an incredible number of years in school, and even more years training afterward. There’s no doubt that doctors know more about an awful lot of medical-related things. However, there’s one big secret Big Medicine doesn’t like to admit: Doctors don’t know everything. And sometimes, they’re not informed as we, the patients are. It’s not their fault, really. Most doctors are generalists—they’re expected to know a little bit about a lot of problems, but they don’t specialize in any one area. There are thousands of different diseases and medical problems out there. There’s just no way one person can possibly be familiar with all of them. Even specialists face the same kind of problem; there’s only so much information any one person can hold in their head at a given time. Sometimes, just like us, they have to look things up. Even when it comes to common issues like diabetes and ...

It hasn’t been a good year for Big Ag giant Monsanto. After a long court battle including an appeal, a French court has done what would be unthinkable here in the U.S. — found Monsanto guilty of poisoning a farmer with one of its chemicals. Unfortunately it wasn’t the infamous “Roundup” in question but an older product called “Lasso.” It is, however, a step in the right direction and shows that sometimes David really can win against Goliath.   The ruling isn’t a mortal wound for Monsanto. It’s not even a bloody nose. It’s more like a bee sting. But here’s the thing: one bee sting won’t kill you, but a thousand might. And this isn’t the only hit the toxic company took this year.    California listed glyphosate, Roundup’s main ingredient, as a known carcinogen. The World Health Organization declared it “probably carcinogenic.” The biggest Native ...

In the past few decades, we’ve developed some very odd—and rather unhealthy—ideas about anger. As a society, we’ve adopted the idea that anger is a bad thing. That it’s something we should never express. In fact, the underlying message we get is that not only should we not express anger, we probably shouldn’t even feel it, and that if we do then there must be something wrong with us.   Maybe this has something to do with the culture of victimhood we’ve transitioned to over the past several decades. Or maybe it’s the other way around; whether this view is a cause or a symptom is a question best left to sociologists. In any case, today the overwhelming popular viewpoint is that to feel angry—and certainly to act on that anger in any way—is to be unstable in some way.   Which is a load of horse hockey, of course. And although I’m not usually on the side of the shrinks, this is one area where ...

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×