Constitutional Health Network:
Exposing Big Pharma

If you take an over the counter anti-inflammatory like Advil, Motrin, or Aleve on a regular basis, you might want to think again. In 2015 the FDA changed the labeling on these drugs to warn that they not only might increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, they unequivocally do. And even short-term usage can make it happen. NSAIDs—killing people since the 1960s? Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) have been around for a long time. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) has been in use since the 1960s, and has been an OTC drug since the 80s. Naproxen (Aleve) was created in the late 70s. Although it was downgraded to OTC status in the mid-1990s in the U.S., it remains a prescription drug in most of the world. Today both are the go-to non-prescription drugs for everything from headaches to arthritis pain.   Several other prescription NSAIDs have been introduced in the intervening years, including Celebrex and the infamous Vioxx. All of these more recent ...

You've been lied to for 40 years...   You hear it all the time…   Even Mom said it when we were sick…   “Drink lots of water….”   We all know proper hydration is essential for our health... And we all know the best way to stay hydrated is to drink lots of water….   ...simple right?   But what if your water isn’t hydrating you? What if you drink bottle after bottle and you’re STILL chronically dehydrated?   Does it mean something’s wrong with you?   No….at least not yet...   It means something is wrong with your water.   >>> Watch this video right now and learn the shocking truth about bottled water...    If you’re drinking bottled water, there’s a good chance that you’re chronically dehydrated no matter how much you drink. And it could be ...

Last year, I told you about how the newest, priciest diabetes drugs like Jardiance and Victoza are making claims that they prevent heart disease. I told you how the news outlets were trumpeting these stories loudly while completely ignoring the safety issues with these drugs—not to mention the price tag. I’ve been waiting for the next development. These pricey pills are nearing the end of their patents, and Big Pharma is looking for ways to keep their hands in your wallet by keeping patented versions on the market. They’ve already managed this with Victoza, which I’ll talk about in a moment. Now they’re trying to do it with Jardiance. And considering the life-threatening side effects that were associated with Victoza, it’s a pretty sure bet that another incarnation of Jardiance—complete with shiny new patent protection—will be a shoo-in. Here’s what’s happening. Once again we’re human guinea ...

If you’re over “a certain age,” there’s a good chance that at some point your doctor is going to suggest you have a stress test on your heart. For many years stress tests were part of the yearly checkup for a lot of people. And even though the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPTF) questioned their usefulness clear back in 2012, they’re still routine practice for many doctors.   But their risks might not be so routine. In fact, evidence shows that some types of stress test might bring on the very thing they’re meant to prevent—heart attacks. Here’s what you need to know if your doctor suggests a stress test: What IS a cardiac stress test, anyway? The purpose of a cardiac stress tests is, as the name implies, to see how your heart performs under stress. There are two different types of cardiac stress test: exercise stress tests and chemical stress tests. In an exercise stress test, you do some type of ...

Whenever I think I’ve gotten my head around the how the mind of mainstream medicine works, something happens to show me just how wrong I am. I read news headlines like ‘Studies Show Eating Higher-Quality Food Leads to Better Health Outcomes” or “Cooking at Home Cuts Obesity Rates” and I shake my head. I think, Someone had to do a STUDY to figure that out? Really? It boggles the mind.   It doesn’t, however, surprise me. I admit it—I’m jaded. I’m cynical. Any illusions I had were long ago shattered. And when it comes to heart health—especially the weight-loss aspect of it—I’m particularly jaded. There have been too many conflicting “guidelines.” Too many downright stupid pieces of advice. Too much that seems designed to cause the very problems it’s meant to solve. But just when I think I’ve seen it all, a story breaks that makes me wonder if I’ve really fallen down the ...

If you’re a regular reader of Constitutional Health, you already know my take on cholesterol-lowering statin drug use. If you’re a new reader, this is my view in a nutshell: I believe that statins are one of the biggest money-making schemes in history. In fact, they might even be the biggest.   Until their patents ran out, statins were the most profitable class of drugs in history. Pharma companies raked in untold billions once they hit the market, even though they were initially prescribed somewhat cautiously. As the money began to roll in, Big Pharma saw a Big Opportunity and pushed to get more people taking them. The “guidelines” for prescribing statins grew wider and wider. In the beginning, they were prescribed for people who had already had a heart attack or stroke. But as the net grew wider, they were prescribed for people with fewer and fewer “risk factors” for heart disease.   Today one person in four who’s ...

The news stories all start out the same: People with atrial fibrillation (afib)—a heart rhythm disorder—may have a higher risk of developing dementia, and it may be due to a widely-used afib medication. What they don’t say (unless it’s buried deep in the middle of the story where no one will read it) is that this “afib medication” isn’t just used for atrial fibrillation. It’s an incredibly common drug. It’s used to prevent strokes. It’s used both to treat heart attacks and to prevent them. It’s used for atrial fibrillation. It’s used to prevent blood clots after hip or knee replacement surgery. It’s used to treat deep vein thrombosis…the list goes on and on. It’s sold under the brand names Jantoven and Coumadin. The drug is warfarin, a blood thinner that till recently was the only game in town for many conditions. Legitimate concern or just a push for newer, pricier drugs? The ...

Back in 2013 and 2014, there was some buzz about a new pill that could combat heart disease on an unprecedented level. It unclogged blocked arteries. It actually reversed hardening of the arteries. And it lowered cholesterol more effectively than statins—all for a few dollars and all without side effects. It sounds too good to be true, but the claims were all backed by solid studies. The pill was manufactured by a biotech company that was a spin-out of respected Cambridge University in the UK. It was marketed under the name Ateronon and it's still on the market today. You can buy it on Amazon for around 22 bucks for a month's supply. And you've probably never heard of it. Why? Because it wasn't a pharmaceutical drug. It was a dietary supplement. And you know what that means: Big Pharma stood to lose money. And of course we can't take cash out of Big Pharma's pockets, no matter how many lives it saves. But wait—haven't I read about ...

When penicillin was discovered, it was the answer to a prayer. From a world where we could literally die from a paper cut if it got infected, we began our evolution to a society that can cure the Black Death with a handful of pills and wipe out tuberculosis with a few months' treatment.    And penicillin was just the beginning.    As the years went by, more antibiotics were discovered and new uses found for them. One of these was quite unexpected — farmers found that feeding antibiotics to meat animals made them put on weight at an amazing rate. Since livestock sells by the pound, this meant that farmers could raise animals to market size on half as much feed and in half as much time. This in turn meant their profits went way up.    Soon everyone was feeding antibiotics to their animals. By 2015, 34 million pounds — an incredible four-fifths of all the antibiotics in the country — were used in animals, ...

A few days ago a story in a popular online news magazine caught my eye. You may have seen it too. “Mental health problems are linked to a risk of dangerously high blood sugar levels,” the headline warned. Ok. No surprise there. Antidepressants are still one of the most-hyped types of drug on the market, despite the fact that they’re no more effective than a placebo and carry a big package of possible side effects. But as I read through the rather short article I discovered something interesting. The story changed the further down the page I read. What began as a straight-up statement that depressed people with diabetes are more likely to get their blood sugar under control morphed into a completely different story by the end of the page. Stories like this are a marketing ploy for Big Pharma — and here’s how it works It starts with a hopeful-sounding headline. In this case, the headline was taken directly from the Reuters story that ...

As much as Big Medicine hates to admit it, the brain is still largely uncharted territory. We're constantly learning new things about the brain and how it works. And often, we find that what we thought we knew might not be the case after all.    Scientists long believed, for example, that once we reached adulthood our brains stopped growing new neurons. We now know that this is unequivocally not true. Some parts of the brain, at least, can grow new cells, make new connections, and even increase in size throughout our life spans. The more active and challenged  we keep our brains the more likely this is to happen. In the mid-1990s, doctors found that the sleeping pill Ambien could, bizarrely, restore brain function in some people who were in a "persistent vegetative state."    We really don't understand the brain.    This is why even the most counter-intuitive medical findings no longer surprise me when it ...

If you've been following the Martin Shkreli/Turing Pharmaceuticals scandal, you've undoubtedly read about the $750 pill that made him infamous. But his story doesn't end there.  After founding Turing Pharmaceuticals — the company which now owns the $750 pill — he bought a second pharma company called KaloBios. This little company owns a drug used to treat a parasitic infection called Chagas Disease. Chagas is a tropical disease. It's very common in Central and South America, where a two-month treatment supply of the drug to treat it costs $50 to $100.    The drug has been around for decades but has never been FDA approved for sale in the U.S. Chagas is uncommon here, and there's simply not enough call for it. It is available through the CDC as an "experimental" drug, though — for free. All it takes to get it is some paperwork and a little patience.    After Shkreli bought KaloBios, ...

Imagine if there were a drug that could reduce the damage a heart attack causes to your heart. Imagine if it could reduce that damage by an incredible eighty percent. Imagine that this drug could cut your risk of cardiac arrest or death after a heart attack too. Imagine that it’s something paramedics can easily give you when the ambulance shows up. Now imagine that it only costs pennies on the dollar. Ok, you can stop imagining now…because this drug actually exists. So why haven’t you heard about it? Why are we not using it every time someone has a heart attack? Because Big Pharma flatly refuses to make it. Here’s why. This is what happens when medicine thinks outside the box Meet Harry Selker, director of the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. His grandfather was the inventor of the first automobile shock absorber, and Selker too has been a life-long tinkerer. But where his ...

It’s been around for some 60 years. Medicine uses it to treat heavy metal poisoning. But mainstream medicine has laughed at the idea that “chelation therapy” could be useful for anything else.    Alternative medical practitioners, on the other hand, have been offering the treatment—which involves using the chemical EDTA to “bind” various minerals in the blood so your body can get rid of them—for decades. They claim it can treat a huge variety of conditions from heart disease to autism and even Alzheimer’s.    Some of the claims appear outlandish. Others, not so much.   Regardless, medicine hasn’t been interested. Science has looked down its arrogant nose with the same disdain it would give the idea of bloodletting or leeches. But the practice has continued. And enough people have claimed to benefit that at last the NIH decided to fund a trial that would settle the argument once and ...

It’s been a tough year for the American Heart Association and other Pharma-affiliated “expert” groups. Science has finally put the lie to some of the long-standing “dietary guidelines” they’ve been selling us for decades, and they’re not happy about it.   First cholesterol got the axe. The evidence that dietary cholesterol DOESN’T cause heart disease is now so compelling that even the USDA took it off their list of bad guys. Of course, that didn’t stop the Big Medicine from expanding the guidelines for who should take cholesterol drugs. Big Pharma wants everyone on a pill . And when Big Pharma isn’t happy, Big Medicine and the AMA aren’t happy either.   Saturated fat was also vindicated. Of course the AMA still recommends low fat. And the high-carb diet that has made us sick and overweight is still held up as a shining example — even though the evidence against it is ...

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